Kenneth R Quigley, PE


Recent Posts

Durability of CFRP Enhanced Concrete Structures

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 19, 2018 11:00:00 AM / by Kenneth R Quigley, PE

The 2017 Infrastructure Report of America* cites that nearly 40% of the country’s bridges are more than 50 years old. This is only one statistic stating that America’s building infrastructure is aging. Rehabilitation and maintenance of older structures and buildings is becoming more critical every day, which also increases the need for further education around assessment and preservation techniques and solutions.

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Adopting a Systematic Approach to Below-grade Waterproofing

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 28, 2018 11:30:00 AM / by Kenneth R Quigley, PE

As construction experts, architects, and engineers we are often presented with scenarios where water intrusion has become an issue in an existing structure. More times than not we are asked to identify the underlying issue and present a solution to correct the issue.

Adopting a Systematic Approach to Below-grade Waterproofing, a recently published article in Construction Specifier, is extremely relevant to our area of focus and validates the point of view that waterproofing should be thought of as a system rather than a product.

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Hurricanes and Construction Cranes - Look Out Below

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 19, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Kenneth R Quigley, PE

With the 2017 hurricane season coming to an end Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria affected large parts of the USA and Caribbean.  Examples of roof uplift can be found in numerous structures. If a roof is not properly tied down the entire roof structure can be blown away as in this photograph from St. Thomas.

During Hurricane Wilma a tower crane at a high-rise condominium construction site in Hallendale, Florida suffered a collapse.  The building, a 28 story concrete structure, is situated between the Atlantic Ocean and Route A1A, and was under construction at the time of the collapse.  The crane was situated on the west side of the building and was connected to the building at the tenth and twentieth floors.  The crane was over 300 feet tall.  The crane broke at the twentieth floor; the top of the crane fell to the ground while the lower portion was damaged but remained attached to the building.  CCA was requested to review the circumstances of the collapse of the crane and provide opinions as to the cause. 

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Hurricane Ties - Keeping the Lid On

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 12, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Kenneth R Quigley, PE

With the 2017 hurricane season coming to an end Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria affected large parts of the USA and Caribbean.  Examples of roof uplift can be found in numerous structures. If a roof is not properly tied down the entire roof structure can be blown away as in this photograph from St. Thomas.

When hurricanes or high winds strike buildings the roofs can be sucked upward in the same manner as an airplane wing.  In extreme cases the entire roof structure can get sucked off the building.  Newer, hurricane-resistant structures incorporate hurricane ties - metal straps which attach the roof securely to the main part of the house below.  Parts of the house are also tied together all of the way down to the foundation providing a path for the roof uplift forces all the way to the foundation.  Without these ties, strong winds will make quick work of a roof. 

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