After Years of Decline, Asbestos Use is on the Rise

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 28, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Mark McGivern, CSI, Aff. M. ASCE

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Every layer matters. A holistic approach to quality control can be useful.

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 21, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Mark McGivern, CSI, Aff. M. ASCE

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Hurricanes and Construction Cranes - Look Out Below

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 19, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Kenneth R Quigley, PE

With the 2017 hurricane season coming to an end Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria affected large parts of the USA and Caribbean.  Examples of roof uplift can be found in numerous structures. If a roof is not properly tied down the entire roof structure can be blown away as in this photograph from St. Thomas.

During Hurricane Wilma a tower crane at a high-rise condominium construction site in Hallendale, Florida suffered a collapse.  The building, a 28 story concrete structure, is situated between the Atlantic Ocean and Route A1A, and was under construction at the time of the collapse.  The crane was situated on the west side of the building and was connected to the building at the tenth and twentieth floors.  The crane was over 300 feet tall.  The crane broke at the twentieth floor; the top of the crane fell to the ground while the lower portion was damaged but remained attached to the building.  CCA was requested to review the circumstances of the collapse of the crane and provide opinions as to the cause. 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Stricter Building Codes Saved Florida’s Commercial Buildings from Irma’s Wrath

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 14, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Mark McGivern, CSI, Aff. M. ASCE

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Hurricane Ties - Keeping the Lid On

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 12, 2017 10:00:00 AM / by Kenneth R Quigley, PE

With the 2017 hurricane season coming to an end Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria affected large parts of the USA and Caribbean.  Examples of roof uplift can be found in numerous structures. If a roof is not properly tied down the entire roof structure can be blown away as in this photograph from St. Thomas.

When hurricanes or high winds strike buildings the roofs can be sucked upward in the same manner as an airplane wing.  In extreme cases the entire roof structure can get sucked off the building.  Newer, hurricane-resistant structures incorporate hurricane ties - metal straps which attach the roof securely to the main part of the house below.  Parts of the house are also tied together all of the way down to the foundation providing a path for the roof uplift forces all the way to the foundation.  Without these ties, strong winds will make quick work of a roof. 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Using Metal Panels to Stand Up to Hurricanes

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 20, 2017 10:30:00 AM / by Mark McGivern, CSI, Aff. M. ASCE

In areas of the U.S. prone to being hit by hurricanes, like Florida, it is critical that buildings are constructed to stand up to the strength of storms.

Weather-resistant Metal Paneling is one application that is currently being used to withstand the potential damage caused by hurricanes.

According to a recent article in The Construction Specifier, Orlando Veteran Affairs Medical Center, located in a region with a 40% risk of encountering a hurricane, has installed more than 245,000 sf of weather-resistant metal walls, tested to withstand winds from a Category 3 hurricane

As stated in the article, the building features thermal efficiency, moisture control, and weather resistance suitable for the hurricane risk in Orlando, the panels are pressure-equalized along horizontal joints. Insulated metal vertical (IMV) joints are also employed, improving visual appeal by creating the illusion of an uninterrupted façade and minimizing both streaking and staining. All panels used are 22-gage and feature foamed-in-place cores to minimize gaps in insulation.

Continue reading full article here. 

 

 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Protecting Infrastructures from Major Floods

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 18, 2017 2:00:00 PM / by Mark McGivern, CSI, Aff. M. ASCE

Flooding has dominated much of the news in recent years and this hurricane season it seems to be even more prevalent. The impact of this flooding is greater due to growing infrastructure and the rapid rate that new construction is going up.

Concrete is the modern world’s most commonly used building material however century-old concrete structures are outlasting modern concrete structures erected in the last 50-years. Why? One factor is the way in which the buildings are reinforced. According to a recent article in The Construction Specifierinstead of using solid stone, most U.S. infrastructure is constructed of reinforcing steel embedded within poured concrete. As the priorities of construction methods shift to increase productivity and streamline scheduling, long-term durability often takes a backseat.

The following article provides case studies about different reinforcement methods being employed to protect against major flooding. Read more.

 Read More

 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

The CCA Group adds Structural Engineer

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 18, 2017 11:15:00 AM / by Mark McGivern, CSI, Aff. M. ASCE

The CCA Group is pleased to welcome John O'Rourke, Structural Engineer.

With deep expertise in residential, commercial, and industrial engineering, John O’Rourke has recently joined CCA’s New York City office as a Structural Engineer.

Mr. O’Rourke’s experience in the roles of Structural Engineer and Project Engineer have spanned across a multitude of residential, commercial, and industrial engineering projects. His direct experience is the result of working within engineering groups consisting of Civil, Structural, Architectural, Building Mechanical, Electrical and Process Piping Engineering Departments.

In addition to his background in engineering, Mr. O’Rouke has gained in depth design experience. His designs include: structural steel buildings, seismic design, shallow foundations, wood structures and buildings, and masonry. Additionally, he has provided special designs for retaining structures and avalanche shielding structures.

 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: The CCA Group announces an alliance with The Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health (CTEH)

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 8, 2017 4:16:52 PM / by Diana Bass

 

SERVING INSURANCE AND LEGAL ENTITIES, AND OWNERS AFFECTED BY HURRICANE HARVEY AN ALLIANCE TO PROVIDE COMPREHENSIVE ENGINEERING, CONSTRUCTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES IS FORMED.

The CCA Group announces the formation of an integrated services alliance with The Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health (CTEH).  The two firms combined resources of over 100 professionals with proven catastrophe experience provide the client a single source provider to assess wind and flood property damages, evaluate environmental contamination, EDP losses, equipment losses.  The alliance also addresses environmental, health, and safety concerns on site or off site.  Asset tracking is available to account for all onside people & equipment.  Rapid deployment and aerial surveys are also in the alliance’s wheelhouse.

Contact us 24/7 at 877-222-0665 or Submit an Assignment on our website: www.the-cca-group.com.

Sectors

  • Aviation- FBO facilities
  • Banks and institutional facilities
  • Commercial buildings including high rise, mall and strip centers
  • Hospitality , Entertainment and sports facilities
  • Hospitals and Medical facilities
  • Manufacturing, Chemical manufacturing, FDA cGMP manufacturing
  • Chemical, Maritime, Inland Marine, Oil & Gas & Rail facilities
  • Municipal buildings: Police, Fire, Administration
  • Multi- family housing (apartments and condominiums)
  • Warehousing & Distribution

Services

  • Engineering- Architecture Environmental- Construction- Equipment Valuation-EDP claims
  • Property Damage Assessments, including scope of repair and estimating via XACTWARE and CSI
  • Property Condition Assessments (buildings, plants, tunnels, site, equipment, EDP, loss of use) and disaster recovery planning and program management
  • Rapid emergency response with Architects, Engineers, and Construction Managers to manage re-occupying and restarting facilities to avoid business interruption
  • Architecture and Engineering Design services for pricing, remediation, and restoration
  • Environmental testing, evaluation, and remediation plan and management
  • Structural Assessments including soils, foundations, facades
  • Habitability and Life Safety Inspections: Environmental and Structural Damage
  • Causation studies (wind vs. flood) and resultant damages
  • Scope of repairs related to property damage for buildings
  • Scope of repairs related to civil and site improvements including utilities, grading, erosion control, and expansive soils (post flooding)
  • Rapidly qualitative, quantitative delineate areas of environmental impact
  • Segregate and track hazardous waste
  • Identify and protect resources at environmental risk
  • Rapid photographic and dimensional documentation via aerial photography
Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

What is the proper organization for your Project?

[fa icon="calendar'] Apr 14, 2017 11:59:08 AM / by John Manning

This is the second post in our year-long series about the best ways to work with your Owner's Representative.  You can view all of the series posts here.

Logically the proper project organization will depend upon the size and complexity of the project. One thing that will never change is the need for there to be one key leader for the Owner on the project.

We noted in our first blog of 2017 one of the key findings of research into failed projects is, “Leadership from Owners needed to increase and there is a need for a strong Owner's representative’s presence.” Whether it is a single individual as the sole representative for the Owner of the project or he/she is the leader of a group of individuals representing the Owner of the project singularly or collectively they must be competent to lead the project from concept to completion. The Owner’s Representative(s) must have the ability, authority and responsibility to execute the requirements of the Owner on the project. This starts with a clear vision for what the finished project will be and the ability to detail that vision to all other stakeholders in the Project. This starts with the development of strong contracts for the Designer(s), Contractor(s) and any other entity necessary for the successful completion of the project.

Collectively the Owner’s Representative team needs have the skill set capable of taking a project from concept to completion, ensuring that the best interests of the Owner are maintained. This team may be totally in-house (employed by the Owner), totally out-sourced (contracted Owner’s Representative) or a mixture. On larger projects there could be multiple tiers of representatives each responsible for a different area of the project or for different scopes. It will be critical for the individual who is in charge of representing the Owner, overall on the project, to detail the job functions of the individuals assigned to the project regardless of which of the three scenarios detailed above are utilized.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]